FOOD

Alfajores!

alfajores with lime

It’s difficult to think of a time when we didn’t know what an ‘alfajor’ was… but the truth is that we’ve only just discovered these delicious treats since arriving to Uruguay 6 weeks ago. They are now our most favourite cookies ever! Alfajores are a very common Latin American cookie, most common in Argentina and Uruguay (with Argentina being the biggest consumer according to Wikipedia).

When we were in Uruguay last month, we were lucky to have our Argentinian friend (and lover and baker of alfajores), Delfina from Fanny & Alexander, show us how to make them. We spent a wonderful afternoon making two different types of alfajores. By the end of the cooking session, the kids had managed to mix up the two different doughs and the result was a marbled alfajore, our very own Adamo version. : )

The kids had so much fun making them that they declared it the ‘best day ever’. If you know her, you’ll know that Delfina has this affect on children.

Delfina has very kindly shared her recipes – both for the cream-coloured ‘Alfajores de Maicena’ with grated lime as well as the chocolate alfajores in chocolate coating. Both are delicious!!

Below are the recipes…
dipping alfajores into coconut

squeezing dulce de leche on alfajores

Marlow making alfajores

Alfajores de Maicena / Cornstarch Alfajores sprinkled with lime zest
-70 grams of butter
-1 cup sugar
-3 egg yolks
-1 lemon (zest)
-1 cup of cornstarch
-1 cup wheat flour
-10 grams of baking powder (roughly 2 teaspoons)
-250 grams of Dulce de Leche
-25 grams of shredded coconut
-1 lime (or above lemon) grated for zest on top

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour the tray.
Using an electric mixer beat the butter and the sugar until it is light and fluffy. Add the 3 yolks, and the lemon zest of half a lemon. In a separate bowl whisk together flour, baking powder and the cornstarch.
Add dry elements in the first bowl (with the sugar and the yolks) and combine ingredients using your hands until becomes a dough.
On a floured surface, roll dough to 0.5 cm thick. Cut into small circles, keeping in mind they are going to be the final size of the alfajor. Bake them for a few minutes (5-10) until cooked. Spread dulce de leche on cooked dough and create a sandwich.
Finally, rotate the edges of the alfajor in shredded coconut.
Ass a garnish you night want to add lemon or lime zest on the top of the alfajor, the zest also serves to offset the sweetness of the dulce de leche.
Tip: if the dough is too dry add more egg yolk not water, the water makes the alfajores harder.
The alfajores always taste better a few days old rather than fresh.

alfajor dough

dipping alfajores into chocolate

Alfajores de Chocolate
-1 cup of cornstarch
-1/2 cup wheat flour
-70 grams of butter
-3 Egg yolk
-1 cup sugar
-½ cup cocoa powder
-250 grams of Dulce de Leche
-25 grams of dried coconut
-10 grams of baking powder (roughly 2 teaspoons)
-1 orange zest
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour the tray.
Using an electric mixer beat the butter and the sugar until it is light and fluffy. Add the 3 yolks, and the orange zest of half a lemon. In a separate bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, cocoa powder and the cornstarch.
Add dry elements in the first bowl (with the sugar and the yolks) and combine ingredients using your hands until becomes a dough. On a floured surface, roll dough to 0.5 cm thick. Cut into small circles, keeping in mind they are going to be the final size of the alfajor. Bake them for a few minutes until cooked. Spread dulce de leche on cooked dough and create a sandwich. Finally, dip into chocolate sauce:

Chocolate coating
-1 bar of Chocolate
-25 gr of butter

Melt chocolate in a bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water. Add butter mixed until combined.
When the chocolate is liquid set aside and quickly soak the alfajor entirely. To settle place the chocolate soaked alfajor on a cooling rack. And enjoy! Alfajores are rare in that they only get better (softer!) the older they are, so they’re best to eat 2-3 days after making…. if they last that long! ; )


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Comments (9)

December 14, 2015

Wow! They look fantastic! I love alfajores, but I always buy them. Thanks for the recipe!


Bethie in London
December 14, 2015

Yummy!! We’ll definitely be making these!


Nina
December 14, 2015

Oh yes! I’m definitely going to make these with the boys! I simply stopped making the classic cookies because the ones my mother makes taste better no matter what…


Katrien
December 14, 2015

Just made them with my four girls. These cookies aren’t going to make it until tomorrow, so delicious.


Courtney in London
December 15, 2015

I’m so glad you liked them!! What fun for your four girls (and admittedly they didn’t last 3 days in our house either….except for the one I hid in the cupboard!!!). xx


December 14, 2015

These cookies look delicious. I don’t think they would last 2-3 days in our household… 😉


SHOW ALL COMMENTS
December 15, 2015

I might try these over the holiday break, but swap in gluten free flour….because gosh darn it, if I’m going to take the time to make cookies, I better be able to enjoy them afterward (wink).


Courtney in London
December 15, 2015

Definitely give it a go! I would think Gluten Free flour would work just fine… (the dulce de leech is really the key ingredient after all!!). 🙂 xx


Courtney in London
December 15, 2015

That was supposed to be ‘dulce de leche’ — silly autocorrect! x


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