FOOD

Foraging (or collecting edible weeds)

wild_chives

Have you ever gone to your local park, forest or garden to collect edible weeds? My kids and I love to go out and pick our dinner in ‘the wild’. It’s fun, and I think it teaches them something about food and nature. Also, it motivates them to help prepare dinner (and eat it).

wild_chives_2
nettles
edible weeds, foraging, stinging nettle

We’ve been making quiches from stinging nettles, salad from dandelion leaves and wild rocket, pesto from nasturtium, we’ve picked and eaten chickweed and wild garlic. All of which we’ve picked in the park, forest, or uncultivated parts of the garden. Isn’t it intriguing how much of the plants and flowers growing around us (and are considered weeds) we can actually eat?

elder_leaves

wild_garlic

Our biggest discovery this year has been the bishop’s weed (elder) in the the garden of my parents-in-law. It’s absolutely delicious in a quiche or stir fried with some (wild) garlic. Do you know of any other delicious weeds you can eat, or maybe you have a good recipe to share?

xxx Esther


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Comments (11)

Hanna
July 16, 2015

We sometimes collect arugula, it’s common weed in Poland and a delicious addition to any salad (or salad base itself).


Esther in Amsterdam
July 20, 2015

Yes! It’s delicious and the wild variety is so much more tasty than the shop bought leaves. 🙂


July 16, 2015

We have never done this, never even thought about it, I wouldn’t know where to start?! I know you can, obviously, but my horticultural knowledge is nowhere near secure enough to make me feel confident feeding it to my children!!


Esther in Amsterdam
July 20, 2015

You can find great websites with a lot of ideas and explanations!


Iris
July 16, 2015

Esther in Amsterdam
July 20, 2015

Oh wat leuk! Ga ik gelijk bestellen :). Dank! x


July 16, 2015

I live in a city where they chemically “treat” the trees and surroundings for “weeds”. So, I wouldn’t trust eating anything I find. But, I grew up in the country picking dandelion, and wild ramps. My mom and grandma would both dry and pickle the ramps to be used in cooking(quiches and stir fry)/salads. The dried ramps could be ground into a powder for seasoning soups and meats. Delicious!


Vanessa
July 16, 2015

Oooh Esther we need to get together and talk weeds!! We love foraging and I think it’s great that the children can get involved too. Nasturtium pesto and my summer favourite this year. Wild garlic frittata is scrumptious and borage soup is delicious. I have this soup bookmarked to make this summer which you may like too – http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/allotment/2012/aug/02/allotments-gardeningadvice
Happy foraging. Vanessa xx


Esther in Amsterdam
July 20, 2015

Next time we’re in France together we’ll have to make a foraging date!! : )


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Leslie Olsson
July 16, 2015

You can also make a sweet drink from the Elder Flower blossoms:

http://www.swedishfood.com/swedish-drink-recipes/133-elderflower-cordial

It’s a very traditional Swedish drink for kids and adults!


Esther in Amsterdam
July 20, 2015

I love elderflower cordial! I never tried to make it myself (I have to try it next year!), but every year I make elderberry cordial, or mix the berries with apple pies. Delicious! x


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