Origami napkins! (by Lollipop Design)


Aren’t these origami napkins from Lollipop design the cutest? And so clever and fun too! We always use cloth napkins for our meals — for environmental reasons, but also because I simply like the look of them. These napkins are so brilliant because they look so super cute, giving a really special touch to the table — plus, they serve some entertainment for on the table as well!

Origami napkin by Lollipop Design (photo Babyccino Kids)
Origami Napkins by Lollipop Design

My kids have each adopted an animal, and love folding and unfolding the pattern at the table. (Which, I must admit, they are so much better in than I am!) Unfolded, they are just like a normal napkin — with a really nice, interesting colour-block pattern.

Origami Napkins by Lollipop Design

I think these napkins would make such a sweet present too, maybe to bring to a dinner party? (I also have already marked them on my holiday list — can you believe that we have to start thinking of Christmas soon?)

xxx Esther

Vegetable Lasagne


We have spent the summer enjoying ourselves and indulging in saucisson, paté, sausages, cheese and bread — as you would if you are on holiday in France. But I am now craving vegetables so badly!

I have spent bit of time browsing the internet for new recipes (as I am a little bit bored of my usual dishes) and stumbled across this recipe for a Vegetable Lasagne. I am a massive fan of Felicity Cloake’s recipes, and was excited to discover this one.

I like the fact that there are not massive chunks of vegetables in it, but rather a lovely, slightly smokey vegetable sauce. It is seriously good, perfect with a big helping of salad!

I am actually going to continue experimenting with different types of Vegetable Lasagnes; I would love to try this one and this one!

– Emilie

A little tip on how to choose a French wine

blue cap

I am still, after living in France for 8 years now, a total wine-choosing novice. I seriously make my friends cringe as I still have the tendency to choose the bottle based on prettiness of the label!

The other week a friend of mine pointed out something to me whilst we were picking up a bottle of wine: the caps on the top of French wine bottles have different colours and it is not random at all. Obviously I then spent a very merry 30 minutes in the wine shop quizing the owner and this is what I found out:

So a blue capsule means the wine is a “vin de table” a cheap(ish) wine, the green capsule means that the wine is from a specific region. The grapes have been grown in that region and the wine was also produced in the same area, and fall under very strict regulations – basically a sign of quality. The orange/ brown capsule is for sweet wines and liquors.

red cap

The other thing to look out for is the words Recoltant ( or the letter R), which means that the wine was created entirely by one person. They grew the grapes, harvested them and produced the wine. Negotiant (or the letter N) means that the wine was made by someone else than the producer of the grapes. Now this does not necessarily mean that the wine isn’t good, but the assumption is that if someone has grown the grapes and produced the wine themselves, they have possibly taken better care.


This is just a rule of thumb by the way – one of my favourite wines, which is produced in my region has a blue cap, but is absolutely delicious. Also these rules differ from country to country here in Europe.

– Emilie

PS BTW apparently 2011 was a good year for wine here in France!


Bitsy’s Brainfood

Ivy 2

Bitsy’s Brainfood is a new, organic children’s food brand which we have recently discovered and which has signed on to sponsor our upcoming ShopUp event in NYC. I was really excited to discover this company, and in the weeks since partnering with them the kids and I have become big Bitsy’s Brainfood fans!

They recently sent over some smart cookies for us to try, and they’re now my kids’ favourite snack.

Bitsy's brainfood alphabet cookies Bitsy's brainfood cookies

Bitsy's Brainfood smart cookies

The smart cookies are baked with organic fruits and vegetables, made with whole grains and are made in a nut-free facility. They’re healthy and they taste good (yes I’ve tried), and I love that they’re alphabet shaped, so kids learn about their letters while enjoying their snack (I swear, Marlow learned her letters from eating alphabet cereal!). I also like that they’re not crumbly or messy — it’s a good snack to have in the car or to keep in your handbag for on-the-go.

Bitsy’s was started by two moms who believe that healthy minds and healthy bodies are connected and that learning to eat smart should be fun. What I love about their products is that they’re not trying to hide the fact that there are vegetables in their products, they want kids to embrace their veggies and know that they are good for them.

I’m so happy to have discovered Bitsy’s Brainfood, and we’re delighted they’re joining us (with free samples!) at the ShopUp in just a couple weeks. Look out for them there (September 13th and 14th)!

Courtney x

Jamberry, by Bruce Degen

reading and eating berries

We have very recently moved to Scotland and we are so lucky to have a wonderful plot of strawberries and a few raspberry bushes in our garden. We have picked so many berries our fingers are stained pink and our bellies are bursting! But what I’ve loved most is that it reminded me of one of our favourite summer time books, Jamberry by Bruce Degen.

reading in the garden
Florence helping in the kitchen

Jamberry is the sweetest of board books. It’s about a young boy and a bear who merrily play through the land of berries. Their adventures are surreal and the word play Degen delights us with makes for a delicious classic. The characters sit in a canoe of blueberries with their hats bursting of berries and they lay in a meadow of strawberries with dancing lambs and ponies. Florence giggles all the way through this book, whilst Helena enjoys making up more crazy berry words!

Bruce Degen, who also illustrates this book, is said to enjoy combining humour with art and it’s his bright images together with a mix of literary rhyme and alliteration that make us want to read this book over and over again.
Having read Jamberry so many times last week, Florence and I decided to make some batches of jam with our collection of berries. She was such a great helper, picking the berries, plucking them clean, and squashing them into the sugar!

Berry jam

The recipe we used is River Cottage’s strawberry jam with sweet scented geranium leaves which I discovered last summer. The geranium leaf really compliments the flavour of the berries and the jam is even more delicious in a Victorian sponge cake with freshly whipped cream! Perhaps that’s something else I’ll make before the girls go back to school.
The book is available from all good bookstores or online from Amazon (US and UK).
Vanessa xx

Our newest YouTube video is now live!

Babyccino Kids YouTube channel Babyccino Kids YouTube Babyccino Kids YouTube

Come join us over at YouTube where we’re sharing our newest video — a delicious and super quick and easy-to-make dessert that everyone is going to love. Maybe something to prepare this weekend??


xxx Esther

PS If you’re not subscribed to our channel yet, you can do that here.

The beautiful creations of Masami Akatsuka of Cocon

cocon placematsMasami Akatsuka is a Japanese mama living in the south of France, and creator of the most delightful objects. Her artful collection, called Cocon, is entirely handmade by Masami herself, and the way she uses colour, material and detail is absolutely wonderful. There’s just so much character in all of her makings!

cocon placemats cocon placemats

I’m a serious fan of Masami’s work. We have a few of her products at home, like the placemats in these photos, and I love seeing them around me. They make everyday rituals just that extra bit delightful!

cocon bird mustard

This little bird on our sideboard is another silent reminder of Masami’s amazing craftsmanship. It’s so perfectly pretty (and sturdy and stable) and has so much expression in its little face — like a tiny piece of art.

Cocon is a very inspirational collection — I’m nowhere near as artistic as Masami, but I did put my sewing machine on the table this afternoon. A quilt is in the making! : )

xxx Esther

Hugo Champagne Spritzer


In the summertime I am very, very partial to having a refreshing drink to nicely finish off the day (one of my favourite drinks is this one). But this summer’s favourite is a Hugo, which I discovered in Berlin a few weeks ago. Sooo very good!

Now this is a very inexact recipe as it really depends on how sweet you like your drink – just have fun testing!

You will need (per glass):

  • Lemon, Lemon juice and mint
  • 100 ml Champagne, Prosecco or and other good sparkling wine
  • 100 ml Perrier
  • Elderflower syrup (cordial)
  • Ice cubes

Put some ice cubes in the bottom of a glass. Gently crush a few mint leaves and pour the prosecco and Perrier into a glass, add a slug of elderflower syrup, a a little bit of lemon juice. Finish off with a wedge of lemon, and one or two ice cubes and enjoy!

– Emilie

PS. Esther and I were making these in jam jars as we were camping last week. Turns out that Bonne Maman jam jars are an excellent size for a cocktail 😉

Dinner – Ready and Served

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Last week we were on holiday in France with Esther and her family. It was such fun seeing the children interact, getting to know each other again and to see how they have all changed in what feels like a blink of an eye (it is also so nice to hang out with a great friend and have time to talk about anything and everything for hours ;)).


For one night on our trip the kids were responsible for dinner, from deciding on the menu, to buying the groceries to cooking the whole meal. Apparently this was the best activity ever — there were secret meetings in which they decided what to make, shopping lists had to be put together and recipes had to be followed.


And it all went off without a hitch! All kids still have all their 10 digits, nobody burnt themselves and we ended up with a genuinely good meal and some very proud children. Kids feel responsible, parents get time off to sip a glass of wine while watching the sun set — everyone is a winner.


PS Apologies for the bad quality photos, we were just quickly snapping on our phones.

Babyccino Kids YouTube Channel (and our first video!)

Broad Bean recipe
pod the beans
broad bean salad
As we’ve hinted over the past few weeks, we’ve been working behind the scenes on some videos for a new Babyccino Kids YouTube channel! It’s something we’ve been talking about doing for ages now, but were just not ever organised enough to make happen.  Last month we finally mustered up the courage, lined up the right crew, and then all met up in Amsterdam to work on our first videos. It was both hilarious and encouraging — being on film is not something any of us are particularly good at (or fond of), but we had so much fun together and managed to make a few videos we feel proud enough to share (and we’re hoping our on-camera skills will improve over time!).

We’re so excited to share our channel with you (which you can subscribe to here) as well as our very first video!!  We share a really easy and delicious summer recipe for Broad Bean Salad which is one of my favourite things to make this time of year.

We hope you enjoy!

Courtney x

Video footage was shot by Esther Verkaik and edited by Chee-Han Kartosen-Wong. A big thank-you to both of them for their patience with us as we navigate this new space. 

The Furoshiki, a Japanese wrapping cloth

Have you heard of furoshikis? They are square fabric cloths used in Japan to wrap everything from lunch, presents, picnics, pillows, groceries, you name it! Made from gorgeous printed cotton fabric, furoshikis are as beautiful as everything coming from Japan.

furoshikis japanese wrapping clothBesides the primary use of a wrap, furoshikis are also great to be used as scarfs, napkins, picnic blankets, table cloths… The biggest size can even be used as a beach bag and once on the beach, it doubles as a perfect beach sheet. The uses really are endless!

Furoshiki japanese wrap cloth
You can find a lovely range of gorgeous furoshikis in different sizes at Musubi London, and here you can learn about the different wrapping techniques. (Don’t you love the wine wrap? What an awesome present to bring to a dinner party!)

xxx Esther

Foraging (or collecting edible weeds)


Have you ever gone to your local park, forest or garden to collect edible weeds? My kids and I love to go out and pick our dinner in ‘the wild’. It’s fun, and I think it teaches them something about food and nature. Also, it motivates them to help prepare dinner (and eat it).

edible weeds, foraging, stinging nettle

We’ve been making quiches from stinging nettles, salad from dandelion leaves and wild rocket, pesto from nasturtium, we’ve picked and eaten chickweed and wild garlic. All of which we’ve picked in the park, forest, or uncultivated parts of the garden. Isn’t it intriguing how much of the plants and flowers growing around us (and are considered weeds) we can actually eat?



Our biggest discovery this year has been the bishop’s weed (elder) in the the garden of my parents-in-law. It’s absolutely delicious in a quiche or stir fried with some (wild) garlic. Do you know of any other delicious weeds you can eat, or maybe you have a good recipe to share?

xxx Esther

Ice pops!

ice pops
ice pops

We’ve been enjoying some tropical heat here in Europe so all the tricks to keep cool are coming out of our sleeves. The other day, Sara made some delicious ice pops, and they were really so super good I thought to share the recipe (which she found in the booklet that came with our pop molds).

ice pops

Here’s the recipe that Sara used (although I think she used more strawberries and three bananas):

  • 6 cups fresh strawberries (she left the green hat bit)
  • 1 ripe banana
  • juice of 1-2 lemons
  • 3 tbs honey

Puree everything in the blender and pour into your pop molds. Freeze overnight, or until frozen.

Stay cool!

xxx Esther

A summer picnic!

La Coqueta summer picnic

LaCoqueta summer picnic 12

I’ve said it before, but one of my favourite things about being in this business is meeting so many inspiring women, many of them mums (most of them mums, in fact) who run a business of their own which somehow connects to ours in one way or the other. It is an industry where women support each other and where small brainstorm sessions turn into exciting collaborations. It is a world where a group of friends can plan an after-school picnic, and because of the talent behind it, it turns out to be one of the most memorable summer garden parties — including delicious food, happy children, a dreamy garden and a water fight finale to end the day!

This past Friday, Celia from La Coqueta invited us over for a picnic in her beautiful back garden, the talented Skye McAlpine offered to cook the food, and Emma Donnelly came over with her camera to help document the day. It was a merging of different talents and good friends. Together we spent the day prepping for a picnic (by ‘prepping’ I really mean watching Skye work her magic in the kitchen!), and then, after picking the kids up from school, we all sat down to enjoy.

LaCoqueta summer picnic2

LaCoqueta summer picnic4

LaCoqueta summer picnic 5

LaCoqueta summer picnic3

LaCoqueta summer picnic 8

LaCoqueta summer picnic 9

La Coqueta summer picnic 11

LaCoqueta summer picnic 10

The kids, all dressed in coordinating outfits from La Coqueta, played so well together — like one big family. They played games, picked flowers and berries from the garden, did cartwheels in the grass… and kept returning to the picnic blanket for a sip of mint lemonade and another slice of cake! Meanwhile, we mums had the chance to talk motherhood, careers, food, photography, and everything in between. I felt so lucky to spend the day with such inspiring women, and the kids keep asking if we can do it again!

I hope you don’t mind me sharing so many photos from the picnic. Emma managed to capture the day so beautifully, don’t you think?

Courtney x

All photos above are taken by Emma Donnelly (except the last two, which were snapped by Skye).

Cordials from Belvoir Fruit Farm


Do you know the fruit cordials from Belvoir Fruit Farm? We have recently discovered them and are all hooked! We love the interesting, grown-up taste combinations, like spiced apple & ginger, rhubarb & strawberry, elderflower & rose, raspberry & lemon…


I try to give my children water or tea for as much as possible, but in the afternoon I’m ok to give them a glass of juice. These ones from Belvoir are so nice, and not overly sweet. We all love them — the ginger cordial is my personal favourite. Super fresh!

xxx Esther

PS I’ll be making my own rhubarb cordial this week, so easy and another lovely fresh drink, especially in combination with sparkling water.

Yvestown in the Kitchen

Yvestown in the kitchen

Do you ever take cookbooks to bed? I do! I just love food — eating it, preparing it, looking at it, and yes, even reading about it.
Yvestown in the Kitchen,  written by Yvonne of the beautiful blog Yvestown, is the kind of cookbook which is just the perfect read. It is the combination of a cookbook, a portfolio of beautiful food styling and photography, and it shows the most gorgeous interiors of some of the writer’s enormously creative friends.



Yvestown in the Kitchen was first published in Dutch but has recently been translated to English, so if you’re looking for a nice present for a food-loving friend (or for your food-loving self!), you can now pick up a copy on Amazon (UK or US) .

xxx Esther

Quiche on my mind…

Quiche1It’s spring, and my mind is set on quiche. I’m not exactly sure why — is it the combination of the flaky puff pastry crust with the creamy filling and the salty cheese melted on top? Is it the fact that it is so easy to prepare? Or is it just because it’s the perfect dish for these warmer days, when it doesn’t really matter what time you eat, or where you eat…

Quiche can be served hot, luke warm, or cold, and it’s so informal — it’s lunch, it’s dinner, it’s a picnic, it’s a left-over… it’s whatever.


I always have puff pastry in the freezer, and usually have eggs, cream, cheese and bacon in the fridge as well. A quiche is quickly made. Many different fillings are possible — rucola, spinach, mushrooms, watercress, endive, peas, peppers, asparagus, courgette — you name it! Combine with grated gouda or cheddar or be more creative with goat cheese, ricotta, or camembert. As a basis, for the creamy bit, and depending on the size of your dish, I like to stick to 2 to 4 eggs per quiche, in combination with about 50 to 100 ml crème fraîche or double cream. Actually, the exact amounts can be played with — it’s always a bit different!


The other day, I preheated the oven to 200°C and buttered three quiche dishes and lined them with puff pastry. Using a fork, I pricked little holes in the bottom of the quiches and set them aside while I made three different fillings.

Quiche one became a ‘quiche lorraine style’ onion/leek quiche. My kids’ favourite. Here’s the how-to:

Gently fry 100 g bacon in it’s own fat. Once brown, add two large onions (diced) and one leek in thin slices. Sauté gently until soft. Divide the mixture over the prepared pastry. Beat eggs with crème fraîche and some freshly ground black pepper. Divide egg mixture over onion mixture, and sprinkle with 100 g of grated cheese. (This is my smaller dish, so I used two eggs and 60 ml of cream.)

Quiche two became a broccoli quiche. Here’s what I did:

Cook the florets of one head of broccoli in salty water for about 5 minutes. Drain well and divide over the prepared pastry. Divide approximately 150 g unsalted cashew nuts over the broccoli. Cut a 250 g camembert cheese in slices and spread over the broccoli. Prepare egg mixture (I mixed 4 eggs and 100 ml of crème fraîche with some salt and pepper) and divide over the quiche.

The third quiche is an old favourite — tuna quiche.

Drain 2 tins of tuna. Prepare egg mixture (4 eggs, 100 ml cream), and mix the tuna and 100 g grated gouda (or cheddar) with the egg mixture. Pour the tuna / egg mixture in the prepared pastry dish. I like to put cherry tomatoes on top — I love the taste of roasted tomatoes and it looks so pretty!

The three quiches bake for about 25 to 35 minutes, or until the cheese is nice and brown on top and the pastry is cooked. Eat hot, warm, or cold, for lunch, dinner, tea, or whatever.

Quiche4Bon appétit!

xxx Esther

PS Tarte à la tomate et à la moutardeis also deliciously easy!

Recipe: Healthy Chocolate Without Sugar!


Recently I found a passion in creating healthy versions of the not-so-healthy treats. For instance, our whole family loves dark chocolate, even Talan who is not even 1.5 years old loves 85% cocoa chocolate because frankly he never even tried any other kind but I wanted to make an even healthier version of it by substituting sugar with dates.

Dates also contain sugar (fructose) but contrary to plain sugar they are also a great source of many vitamins, minerals and fibers. They contain oil, calcium, sulfur, iron, potassium, phosphorous, manganese, copper and magnesium. They are also very well known to help with health issues like constipation, anemia, diarrhea and many more. Just like with any other food, overeating is never a good idea but if eaten in normal quantities dates can do you only good.

And there is also cocoa, which is only one of the healthiest foods on the planet – did you know that? Just google Cocoa health benefits.

So this recipe is a definite win-win! My kids love it and I love looking at them while having their faces (an unfortunately also half of our dining room furniture) covered in it.


Here’s the recipe:

-1 cup cocoa butter
-1 cup raw cocoa
-date paste by taste

First, to get the date paste simply mix whole pitted dates in your food processor until smooth in consistency.


Then slowly melt the butter in a pan (or a heatproof bowl) by sitting it over another pan of barely simmering water and stir frequently.


Once melted remove from heat, add cocoa and dates (I used about a table spoon of paste but we like bitter tasting chocolate) and stir well.


Pour the mixture chocolate into a flat dish lined with parchment paper and sprinkle with roasted nuts, raisins, cranberries… or leave as is.

Put in a refrigerator for a couple hours, brake into pieces and enjoy!

Ps. the chocolate is much sweeter once hard so take that into consideration while tasting the liquid mixture 😉


To read more from Polona, go to her cute blog Baby Jungle!

Delicious Cantuccini (or almond biscotti)


My friend Erika from Mikodesign brought me a jar of homemade Cantuccini cookies recently, and they didn’t last longer than a day. They are SO good! She told me they are super easy to make, so I asked her for the recipe which thankfully she was happy to share. Here goes:

350 gram flour
3 eggs
200 gram castor sugar
2 t.sp. vanilla (or two sachets of vanilla sugar)
250 gram nuts and almonds (no peanuts), unsalted and not roasted
1 t.sp. baking powder
1/2 t.sp. salt
1/2 t.sp. baking soda
1 table sp. grated orange peel
2 table sp. liqueur, f.e. Grand Marnier

Pre-heat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking tray with baking parchment.

Sift and mix the flour with baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium sized bowl. In a large bowl, mix the sugar, vanilla, the grated orange peel and the liqueur together with the eggs until slightly foamy.
Combine the dry and the wet ingredients to a heavy, sticky dough. Knead in the nuts.

Shape the dough into two logs and place them on the baking tray. Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 30 minutes, until lightly browned and still a little soft.
Take the logs of the baking tray and allow to cool (minimal 2 hours — it’s important for the logs to be cold enough in order to be able to slice them well!).

Now preheat the oven to 150°C. Cut the logs with a good bread-knife in 1 cm thick slices. Lay on an oven rack and dry for another 8-10 minutes until golden-brown.

You can (try to) keep these cookies in a closed jar for up to 3 to 4 weeks.

xxx Esther

PS this recipe originates from the Foods and Photos blog (in Dutch).

Tuesday Tips: (trying to) raise good and healthy eaters

kids healthy eatingHow come some children are good, healthy eaters, and some are super picky and have a difficult relationship with food? Is it a matter of nature, or of nurture? I was recently chatting with my girls’ ballet teacher, a lovely lady of sixty-something, and she was telling me about her baby granddaughter, who basically refused to eat anything from the day she was born. She’s been in and out of hospitals, being fed with drips, feeding tubes in her nose, and all sorts of astronaut kinds of food. There doesn’t seem to be a physical reason that the baby is refusing to eat — the little girl simply has no interest, probably even an aversion, to food. (I can only imagine how difficult this must be for the baby’s parents.)

So we can’t say that difficult or picky eaters are always a product of their upbringing. I do however think that very often, our own attitude to and relationship with food is of an enormous influence on our children.

My own four children happen to be very good eaters. They are interested in food, they try new things, and are not overly picky or fussy. Probably my husband and I have partly been lucky, and we’ve partly been doing some things right.

Eating is a much debated and quite sensitive topic amongst parents. This weekend I was talking with some girlfriends after we just had lunch with our families. We were discussing how we raise our children, and what parenting choices we have made to help our children become the good eaters they are today. I thought this would be an interesting (but difficult) topic for our Tuesday Tips series, so I have made a list of tips that in my experience can help make eating a positive and fun part of the day. Here goes:

Involve the children in the dinner preparation. They can start helping at quite an early age. Tell them what you are doing, let them try the ingredients. Trust them with a knife — Ava has been making a really good Caprese Salad from the age of 4. Even Casper (2) chips in with cutting the mozzarella! Also: grow your own veggies if possible (even on the windowsill). Take your children shopping (f.e. to the (farmers) market), let them choose some food and prepare that food that evening. When your children have been actively involved in the dinner preparation, they will be more open to try and enjoy the food.

Eat with the children as often as you can. Sit at the table, and have a proper family dinner experience. Don’t turn the tv on (you could even argue to turn the music off). Dinner is a social experience, it’s about connecting with each other and sharing the pleasure of each other’s company and good food. Set the scene, make a nice table, use little bowls, napkins, light candles, etc

Don’t allow negativity about food, instead be positive and adventurous about food. Set the right example; don’t ‘dislike’ food yourself. If you love food, your children will love food. I’ve had children at my table who started to be negative as soon as I served the food on the table. ‘Oh, tomatoes! I hate those! Eeeks, I don’t eat brussels sprouts, they are disgusting!’ I personally don’t allow my children to use those kind of strong associations in connection with food. In general, I want my children to understand that the food that I buy, prepare and serve on our table, is good, healthy and delicious food. I don’t allow my children to be disrespectful to this food, or to the cook (me!) who has done her best to prepare a yummy meal.

Be relaxed about food. When introducing a new food — don’t overhype or over-react, be casual about it, make it a part of the regular eating experience. I also have experienced that some foods, which I expected my children not to like (sauerkraut, for instance, or olives), have been received with great enthusiasm. So instead of being doubtful (‘you can try, but you probably won’t like it’), be casual. You might be surprised!

Always encourage your child to try everything on the table. Don’t let them get away with ‘not liking’ something too easily. If my children, after positively trying the food, don’t like it, I ask them why they have difficulty with it — for instance, the food can be too spicy, too bitter, too salty, etc. I then try to get where they are coming from, and most often understand, but maybe we talk about how ‘too salty’ can also be good in combination with other things. Overall, this has made eating and trying food a more positive experience and a fun interaction.

If a certain food is disliked, just let it pass, but don’t ban it from your kitchen. Positively offer it to them again at other times. Encourage them to keep trying; their taste might change and chances are that at some point, they will (learn to) like it. Especially if they see other people enjoying that food!

When your kids don’t want to eat their dinner, that’s ok, but don’t offer a substitute.

Expose your children to different varieties of food from a young age. Don’t generally cook ‘child-friendly’ dishes for your children, serve them regular adult dishes with regular herbs and spices. (I personally believe that even during pregnancy it’s important to eat a variety of dishes!) Take your children to restaurants, and choose from the main menu (most restaurants will be happy to serve half of a main dish to a child, or split one main dish on two plates). Emilie told me that she encourages her children to be flexible in their eating so she can take them to friends places and she can travel with them and experience different cultures. She told me that she refuses to be a guest in someone’s house and have her child turn their nose up at a meal, so if her girls want to come, they will have to eat without making a fuss!

That’s it! I realise this is a tricky subject, so please remember that these are tips that stem from my own experience. I’m curious to find out what your family’s relationship with food is. What’s your attitude? What are your tips and routines?

xxx Esther

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